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2014 Indian Lok Sabha Elections Results in Excel

2014 Lok Sabha Election Results

2014 Lok Sabha Election Results

It is election season now, with results of 2019 Lok Sabha Elections in India to be announced in a few days on 23rd May 2019.

I wanted to develop a simple template in Excel that can allow us to view 2009 and 2014 Election results, and gain insights through simple data visualization techniques.

Download this free Excel template to view the results of 2009 and 2014 Lok Sabha Elections. You may also find data visualization techniques that you can apply to other topics or datasets. If you have any suggestions to make it better, please post them in Comments section below.

2014 Lok Sabha Election Results in Excel

Features of Template

Free Download

Video Demo

Parliament View

In the Parliament view, each cell represents a constituency and there are 543 constituencies. You can use 4 options available to you, to create a visual that specifically addresses a question.

Lok Sabha Elections – 543 Seats

First, let me explain the four options to control to visual.

1. DISPLAY: This determines what value is displayed on each cell.

Display Filter options

The four options within DISPLAY are

  1. STATE – State to which the constituency belongs
  2. PARTY – (Abbreviated) Name of Party that won that constituency in the election.
  3. ALLIANCE – Alliance (UPA or NDA or Others) that won that constituency in the election
  4. WIN MARGIN % – The Winning Margin % (difference between winner and runner up as a % of all votes polled in that constituency) in that constituency

2. COLOR: This determines what color is applied to each cell.

Color Filter options

The four options are

States and Union Territories – By Color
Party Colors INC, BJP and Others
Alliance Colors NDA, UPA and Others
Win Margin % in 5 categories

3. SORT: This determines how the 543 constituencies are sorted and thus which constituency represents which cell. This helps in organizing or grouping constituencies together by State or Party or Alliance.

Sort Filter options

The three options are

  1. STATE – State to which the constituency belongs
  2. PARTY – (Abbreviated) Name of Party that won that constituency in the election. To simplify the visual, all parties except INC (Indian National Congress) and BJP (Bharatiya Janatha Party) are combined as one unit.
  3. ALLIANCE – Alliance (UPA or NDA or Others) that won that constituency in the election

4. YEAR: As the template has data for 2009 and 2014 elections, you can choose Year to view results of that specific year’s elections.

Year Filter options

Using the above 4 choices, you can come up with many combinations to create different visuals. I will share a few common ones that I find interesting below. When you download the template, please feel free to change the filters to create your own visuals.

Lok Sabha Representation by Alliance

2009 Lok Sabha by Alliance

UPA had only 262 seats in 2009, not enough to win majority (272) needed to form government. But it had outside support from some of the ‘Others’ to get it cross over the majority mark.

2014 Lok Sabha by Alliance

NDA had 336 seats in 2014 to clearly win majority (272) needed to form government.

Lok Sabha Representation by Party

2009 Lok Sabha by Party

INC by itself did not have enough seats (206) in 2009 to win majority (272) needed to form government. But it had outside support from some of the ‘Others’ to get it cross over the majority mark.

2014 Lok Sabha by Party

BJP by itself had enough seats (282) in 2014 to win majority (272) needed to form government.

Lok Sabha Representation by State/Union Territory

This view shows how many seats each State/Union Territory contributes to 543. UP is clearly the state that gets the most seats, while MH (48), AP (42), WB (42), BR (40), TN (39) are the next 5 states with a lot of seats.

Note: AP is split to AP and TG (Telangana) from 2019 Lok Sabha elections.

Lok Sabha by State/Union Territory
Colors of State/Union Territory

Top Parties in State/Union Territory

2009 Lok Sabha – Display State – Color by Party

In 2009, INC was strong in AP, RJ, HR, DL and KL. It also had good representation in MP, MH, GJ and UT.

2014 Lok Sabha – Display State – Color by Party

BJP almost swept UP in 2014. It also had good representation in MP, RJ, GJ, DL, JH, HR and UT.

Top Parties in State/Union Territory

This is related to the previous set of views. But here, we are displaying Party name and hence can see other parties that won.

2009 Lok Sabha – Display Party Name – Color by State
2014 Lok Sabha Elections – Display Party – Color by State

BJP almost swept Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat and Rajasthan. Among other parties, AITC in West Bengal and ADMK in Tamil Nadu had big wins as well.

Win Margin % by Alliance

The next two views show the Win Margin % by each alliance in 2009 (first image) and 2014 (second image).

2009 Win Margin % by Alliance
2014 Win Margin % by Alliance

You can see that the 2014 NDA has a lot more green (Dark Green is >=20% win margin) than the UPA in 2009. This indicates that NDA in 2014 had a clearer mandate from the people with a much bigger win margin in each constituency it won.

State View

State view is much simpler to explain. You can view the top parties and their performance either for all states or for chosen states. You can use the filter on the left to choose states.

State View of 2009 and 2014 Lok Sabha Elections

The view shows 2009 results, 2014 results and compares 2014 vs 2009. Let’s consider 2009 results first.

State View of 2009 Lok Sabha Elections

You can see Parties sorted by Seats Won and when there is a tie, they are sorted by Votes Polled.

For example, in 2009, INC had 206 seats won, that is 47% of 440 seats it contested. It received 11,91,11,019 votes that is 29% of all votes polled in 2009.

Calculations

State View of 2014 Lok Sabha Elections

You can see the same metrics for 2014. In addition, you can see the change in 2014 compared to 2009.

For example, BJP won 282 seats out of 428 it contested (at 66%). It had a vote share of 31% of all votes in entire country. It had 166 more seats in 2014 compared to 2009. It increased its votes by 9,32,22,168 and 12.2% increase in Vote share% (31% in 2014 compared to 19% in 2009).

As mentioned earlier, you can view this information for one or multiple states. Let me show one example of that. If I filter on Tamil Nadu as State, this is what I will get.

Tamil Nadu – 2009 Lok Sabha Elections

DMK had 18 seats, ADMK 9 and INC 8 in 2009.

Tamil Nadu – 2014 Lok Sabha Elections

In 2014, It was almost a sweep where ADMK had 37 seats. BJP and PMK won 1 each. ADMK increased vote share by 21.4% gaining mostly from INC and DMDK.

NOTA (None of the Above) option was introduced in 2014 and made it to top 10 parties’ list.

Constituency View

In this view, you can choose a specific constituency and view the top 5 candidates in 2009 and in 2014.

First, choose the State which will narrow down the Constituency drop down.

Select State to narrow the values in Constituency drop down

Then, you can view the details of that specific constituency. An example is shown below with call-outs of information presented.

Example of Constituency view result

Let me share screenshots of some constituencies.

The most famous constituency from 2014 – Varanasi in UP.

2014 Varanasi – Lok Sabha Election Result

An example seat that switched from one party to another in 2014.

2014 Chennai North – Lok Sabha Election Result

One of the closest wins with 36 votes making the difference – in Ladakh in 2014.

2014 Ladakh – Lok Sabha Election Result

One of the most comfortable wins – Surat in 2014 – Winning Margin was 5.3 lakh votes (56.2%).

About Elections Data

Elections data could be considered as an ideal dataset for visualizations and analysis in Excel, as they are usually smaller in size. However, what makes it challenging, especially Indian elections data, is the quality of data available.

New states are created, constituencies are re-organized and renamed, new parties are formed, new alliances are created every time, and so on. They make it hard to expand the scope of analysis to more than 1 or 2 election years. Candidate names and Party Names are not entered in a consistent way. That makes historical analysis by candidate and party almost impossible, unless you spend significant time in improving data quality.

Source

I have tried my best to source data from official Indian election commission website and where needed, I leveraged Wikipedia. If you find any inaccuracies in the template, please post in comments below and and I will be glad to correct. My goal is to make such public data available in usable formats to all.

Elections and Me

Since my school days (a long time ago 😊), I have always been fascinated with elections. I never followed any political news for 5 years (which is the term of a government in India), but still sat in front of TV on the counting day to watch the results live. I used to view it as a race or a live sporting event where results come in every minute and the winner can change. The excitement lasted only for a few hours as the winner will be usually clear after that. I never bothered to follow politics after that day until the next counting day came up 5 years later.

As I grew up, my views on politics and elections have changed for the better (at least that’s what I think). I do follow everyday politics day and understand the nuances slightly better now. Though I get disgusted at the current state of political activities, it’s hard for me to stay away from it.

If you find this template useful, please share with your friends. Please provide your feedback in the comments section below. I look forward to hearing from you.

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